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Photo of the Day
Preparation continues for decorative boat parade
by Sean Tubbs | Friday, September 29, 2017 at 10:26 a.m.
Alexandria Searls puts finishing touches on Lewis & Clark's entry in decorative boat parade
Credit: Sean Tubbs
Alexandria Searls puts finishing touches on Lewis & Clark's entry in decorative boat parade
Searls holds up an example of a photo taken from under the surface of the Rivanna River
Credit: Sean Tubbs, Charlottesville Tomorrow
Searls holds up an example of a photo taken from under the surface of the Rivanna River

This photo looking up from the bottom of the Rivanna River captures leaves as well as the ever-changing surface.

The goal of the underwater photograph program is to bring more attention to the living creatures that live in area waterways
Credit: Sean Tubbs, Charlottesville Tomorrow
The goal of the underwater photograph program is to bring more attention to the living creatures that live in area waterways

The goal of the underwater photograph program is to bring more attention to the living creatures that live in area waterways. Searls holds up a photograph of a macroinvertebrate held by one of the Lewis and Clark Center's students.

The Photo Boat was built mostly from a single sheet of plywood
Credit: Alexandria Searls
The Photo Boat was built mostly from a single sheet of plywood

The Photo Boat will demonstrate the Lewis and Clark Center's underwater photography program during the FLOW festival on the Rivanna River on Saturday, Sept. 30.

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Alexandria Searls, executive director of the Lewis and Clark Exploratory Center, puts the finishing touches on her organization's entry into the decorated boat parade that is part of FLOW: the Rivanna River Art Festival.

The parade -- known as the Flowtilla --  begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 30 at the boat launch at Darden Towe Park.

Searls said the entry from Lewis and Clark is called the Photo Boat and will contain pictures from underneath the surface of the Rivanna. The center has been conducting workshops to train people how to take photographs that reflect the view from the bottom of the river.

"For me it's about getting to know the river and knowing what it's like underneath," Searls said. "The boat itself is going to be a display of those pictures."

Searls said the boat is made from a single sheet of plywood to demonstrate sustainable building techniques.

The FLOW festival will also feature art installations, music and performance art throughout the day.

 

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Tags Rivanna River