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Albemarle County on Wednesday continued its remembrance of the 1898 lynching of John Henry James with the unveiling of a traveling history exhibit featuring the soil collected from the lynching site. On the first floor of the County Office Building on McIntire Road, photographs and a historical narrative that contextualizes the James’ arrest and lynching join the soil.

James, who sold ice cream, was accused of rape by a prominent white woman and was jailed in Staunton ahead of court proceedings. When a train transporting him approached Wood’s Crossing in Albemarle on July 12, 1898, a white mob stopped the train, hanged James and took turns shooting his body.

Although the men were unmasked and law enforcement was on scene, no one was charged in the lynching.

Last year, soil from the lynching site was transported to a national memorial in Alabama, and a historical marker on the lynching was unveiled Friday afternoon in Court Square.

The exhibit in the County Office Building also will travel through the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library system from February to June each year. Additionally, it is available by request to other organizations by contacting Siri Russell, Albemarle’s director of equity and inclusion.

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    Albemarle County Board of Supervisors members Ann H. Mallek and Supervisor Diantha McKeel review an exhibit on John Henry James in the County Office Building on McIntire Road. The county on Wednesday, July 17 unveiled a traveling exhibit commemorating and contextualizing James' 1898 lynching.

    Credit: Mike Kropf/Charlottesville Tomorrow

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    Andrea Douglas, executive director of the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, speaks Wednesday during the unveiling of an exhibit on John Henry James in the County Office Building. The exhibit commemorates and contextualizes James' 1898 lynching.

    Credit: Mike Kropf/Charlottesville Tomorrow

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    Albemarle County Supervisor Diantha McKeel speaks Wednesday during the unveiling of an exhibit on John Henry James in the County Office Building. The exhibit commemorates and contextualizes James' 1898 lynching.

    Credit: Mike Kropf/Charlottesville Tomorrow

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    An exhibit on John Henry James is located in the main lobby of the Albemarle County Office Building. The county on Wednesday unveiled a traveling exhibit commemorating and contextualizing his 1898 lynching.

    Credit: Mike Kropf/Charlottesville Tomorrow

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    A crowd gathered in the County Office Building for the unveiling of a traveling exhibit on John Henry James. The county on Wednesday unveiled a traveling exhibit commemorating and contextualizing his 1898 lynching.

    Credit: Mike Kropf/Charlottesville Tomorrow

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    The John Henry James exhibit in the Albemarle County Office Building also will travel through the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library system from February to June each year and is available by request to other organizations. The county on Wednesday unveiled a traveling exhibit commemorating and contextualizing his 1898 lynching.

    Credit: Mike Kropf/Charlottesville Tomorrow

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    Soil from the site of the lynching of John Henry James sits in a vessel in the Albemarle County Office Building. The county on Wednesday, July 17 unveiled a traveling exhibit commemorating and contextualizing the 1898 lynching.

    Credit: Mike Kropf/Charlottesville Tomorrow